I HAVE MOVED

After a lot of thought and consideration -- I have decided to retire One Foot in Reality and leave it as an Archive. I will still monitor it to keep the trolls at bay, but will not be posting here any longer.

If you are looking for my new posts, please go to www.haroldlshaw.com .

Thank you for all they years of following One Foot In Reality.

Harold

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Running Past 50 - Book Review

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 25, 2012


During Christmas I asked for and got several books on running. One of them was appropriately named "Running Past 50" by Richard Benyo. I definitely got a hard time from people around me when I opened this book up on Christmas :-).

This book was published in 1998, so some of the information is a little dated and I wonder how the author would change this book 14 years later?

Seemed Negative

Initially I honestly didn't like the tone of the "Running Past 50", it just seemed so negative about the changes taking place as we age. Instead of focusing on the positives that come with aging and being a runner, it seemed to focus a lot on the negatives and the "runners mentality" of doing too much or not listening to others.

Perhaps it was Benyo's way of trying to give over 50-year-old runners a wake up call, but at one point I almost just put the book in the give away pile. I already know many of the negatives of aging and want to know how to keep aging at bay or at least some ideas to at least delay it when I can.

However, I continued to plug through "Running Past 50" and ended up reading the entire book.
Running Shoes

I disagree with his section on "The Matter of Footwear" pg 33, based on the things we have learned over the past 14 years since the book was published. I tend to think that a more minimalist shoe works best for me and many other runners. His section on how to choose a running shoe does help the reader to understand some of the "games" of the running shoe industry and was enlightening on some things.

More Positive

As I got further into the "Running Past 50", it began to take a more positive view, which is what I wanted - I am a glass half-full kind of guy. The chapters rolled by pretty quickly with main topics that included:

Part 1 - The Machine
Part 2 - The Elements of Training
Part 3 - The Art and Science of Ingestion
Part 4 - Training Alone and Together
Part 5 - The Walking Wounded
Part 6 - Head Games

At 239 pages the book is a pretty quick read.

Enjoyed Most

The section that I enjoyed the most was "Training Alone and Together". I have almost always been a solitary runner, with brief periods of running with others. I have thought about trying to get back into the more social aspect of running and to be honest after reading this section I really wanted to again. Sometimes you really don't realize how much or what you miss when all you do is run to run.

Another thing that I enjoyed were the short bio snippets about runners that I had read about in running magazines over the past 40 years. It gave quick stories about: Helen Klein, Dick Collins, John Keston, Ruth Anderson, Walt Stack, Joe Oakes, Dr. George Sheehan, and Ron Kovacs. I learned a little about each person - although each could/should have their own book and I am sure they would be very interesting reads. The little snippets were great additions to the book, not filler.

Quote

The one quote from the book that really stuck with me was:

"Change is going to happen. It happens every day. There is no way to stop it. We have two options: to be "victims" of change, kicking and screaming and whining all the way, or to get a jump on it and embrace the change in our lives by instigating some of it ourselves before it has a chance to instigate itself. The way we have some control over exactly what the change is and what outcome to expect."

My shortened version of what he is saying is:

It is your life and it is up to you to make the choices that decide what your future can be. Just know what the choices are and what you want.

For a book that I wasn't going to finish reading, I am glad that I read it. However, it is not a book that I will keep in my running book library.

Have you read "Running Past 50"? What did you think of it?

What running books do you recommend that I read next?

I would give it a 5 out of 10.

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Brain Training For Runners - Book Review

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 19, 2012 


 
Cover of
I just finished “Brain Training for Runners” written by Matt Fitzgerald, which was published in 2007.  

The big push when I was leaving education last year was “Brain Training/Learning/Teaching” and I had some initial trainings in it, so I was interested in how this book incorporated brain training into running.

When I was thumbing through the book I turned to this quote and this is what made my decision to buy the book:
"According to the brain-centered model of exercise performance, a runner achieves his race goal when his brain calculates that achieving the race goal is possible without catastrophic self-harm."
For some reason after reading that statement and the rest of the paragraph on page 57, I wanted to learn more about what Fitzgerald had to say. It piqued my curiosity.

Lots of Similarities

Something that struck me is that Fitzgerald’s view of a proper running form is very similar to the other books and articles that I have read recently and it also seems that he was on the leading edge of the minimalist/natural running movement that is much more mainstream today than it was back in 2007.

All the books that I have read recently seem to promote the same basic idea of what is good running form, injury prevention, nutrition and some other similar messages, but differ in how they get you to get there or the terminology being used.

Either there is a big bandwagon effect going on here or the running gurus are starting to agree that certain things are part of good running, because I am reading an awful lot about the following lately:
  • homo sapiens were designed to run
  • we get injured when we don’t run naturally
  • run more often, but run naturally (head erect, standing tall, compact arm swing, bending at the ankles, midfoot strike, etc.)
  • listen to your body/don’t run when injured
  • use minimalist type footwear
  • don’t beat your body to a pulp - have hard/easy days and rest days
  • eat right for you
  • do some crosstraining
  • if you race, it will hurt
I am sure there is more, but these seem to be the basics of how to run better, when you distill down all the information that is being put out lately.
 

A bit tedious

 
Getting back to “Brain Training for Runners”, I found the first three chapters tedious. I understand the need to set the ground work, so that the reader understands the “why” more later in the book when Fitzgerald is discussing “how to”.  However, getting through those first chapters was tough.

Once I got through chapter 3, I enjoyed the book a lot more. Chapters 4-10 gave me concrete ideas to follow and was written so that I understood, without my having to go back and re-read what he was trying to tell me several times, to figure it out.
 

Racing is Painful

 
In chapter 8 on “Mastering the Experience, he didn’t gloss over - that long distance racing at max effort is uncomfortable and can be painful. He tells it like it is, as you get fatigued, you start to hurt during a race and how well you do is often directly related to the amount of pain/discomfort you can deal with.

I appreciated his story about his inability to deal with the pain that accompanies racing when he was younger - been there done that. This is probably the real or at least part of the reason that I gave up racing for such a long time. I didn’t want to deal the with pain part of running races - because I knew if I was going to run a race and give it my best shot - it was gonna hurt and I don’t like to be in pain, when I don’t have to be.

This quote about accepting the pain made me stop and think about it for a few minutes:
“The meaning of “accepting pain” is quite literal. When it comes, you don’t wish it away, but instead welcome it as an indication that your are working as hard as you should be.”
In the past I never accepted the pain, I believed that it was something that was unwelcome, meant that I had gotten to the point where I would might hurt myself if I went any further and always backed away from the pain. I certainly have never “embraced the pain” in my career as a runner.
 
I guess that is the difference between a competitive runner and a recreational racer, their ability to “embrace the pain”.
 
A lot of what Fitzgerald wrote about in "Brain Training for Runners" probably applies to competitive runners or runners who want to take their training to the next level and become more competitive.  While the average runnah, could gain a lot from reading this book, I don’t really believe that it is geared towards a recreational runnah or racer.  I tend to believe that “Brain Training for Runners” is for those runners who want to take their running beyond running to run.

Part 2

 
The book also looks pretty thick at 562 pages, however part 1 of the book is only 208 pages, the remaining 300 plus pages in part 2 are different training plans that Fitzgerald has developed. It is actually a fairly quick read.

Part 2 of the book are training plans for various distances from 5K to Marathon. I am not a big fan of formal running programs in a book or online (personalized coaching is a different beast).
 
They might work great for some people, but for me I get too stressed if I don’t do what is planned. Even though Fitzgerald strongly advocates listening to your body and changing a workout when needed, knowing myself and my “let it be written, so it will be done” mentality...let’s just say I probably won’t use his training plans, exactly as he has written them.
 
I will however, take some of the his ideas and incorporate them into my running.
 
However, if for some reason I decided to become competitive again, this will be one of the books that I will look at while I am designing my training plan.
 

The reality is that

 
Books like this tend to push me towards the competitor side while I am reading them, but my history tells me that recreational racer better describes the kind of running I enjoy more and will probably do.
 
I found the book very insightful and fairly easy to read, once I got through chapter 3. "Brain Training for Runners" is a book I would recommend it to more experienced/intermediate runners who are thinking about taking their running to the “next” level.
 

I would give "Brain Training for Runners" a 6 on the 10 scale and will keep it in my library for future reference purposes.

Saturday, January 14, 2012

The 33rd Annual January Thaw 4.5 Mile Road Race

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 14, 2012

I conned another runner to take this picture after the finish
The 33rd Annual January Thaw 4.5 Mile Road Race
Belgrade, ME 10:00AM Belgrade School, 158 Depot Rd
Contact: January Thaw Road Race (Central Maine Striders)

Today I did something that I haven't done a lot of since 1986, in fact only one other time since then (back in 2006).

I ran in a road race. 

I also set a race PR for 4.5 miles! Pretty soft, but still a PR.
I had thought for some reason or other that this race was on Sunday, last night I sent an email to the contact person, just double checking the information and I got a reply back saying it was Saturday. At that point it was after midnight and I decided that if I was racing in the morning, I'd best get to bed.

After all that I came pretty close to not going this morning.

The old inertia factor and racing can be intimidating - especially when once upon a time you might have been pretty decent and now you know that you are not anymore. If you want to race you can't live on yesterday anymore, but have to accept how you run now.

Looking back honestly I have a feeling that is at least part of the reason I didn't race more often.

TheWife just told me to get going and out the door I went.

The race was only 15 minutes from the house so I got there an hour before the start. It was a small local race and everything was pretty low-key.

Which was the perfect way to ease back into racing, I didn't want the stress and hubbub of a large race, where there was a lot stuff going on and a bazillion people wandering back and forth. The total number of people for this race was 32.


I got to meet and talk with other runners and a couple other Maine running bloggers which I thought was pretty cool. How often do we actually get to meet fellow blogger's face to face!

Jen & Carrie

Their blogs are Running With The Girls and Maine Mom on the Run. In answer to your questions, they both kicked my butt pretty soundly! Gives me a little motivation to get rid of the rest of my flab and do some speed work :-). We will see how this goes after the summer.

 

Lining up at the starting line. I love this picture with the oldfarm house in the background.
 
Listening to race instructions

For this race I wanted to start slow and just keep up a nice easy pace. I wasn't trying for an all out effort, I was here more for the experience of participating in a race again. My goals were very modest, I wanted to go out, not blow up and embarrass myself, keep the pace between 8:00 and 9:00 minute per mile.

I was so busy taking pictures that I forgot to start my stopwatch, so I had no idea of how fast I was on my splits - not that I really cared today.

 
 
 
 
As you can see the road conditions were not the best and it was about 20 degrees, but I still had fun during the race.

I started last and moved up to 23 finishing the 4.5 mile course in exactly 40:00 minutes, if I hadn't taken the time to snap these pictures during the race, would have been faster, but I thought it was more important to have the pictures :-).

I liked the course a lot, it has the potential to be a very fast course, but today was not the day for it to be fast, I was more concerned a couple of times by traffic and falling than I was about my time.

Luckily, I didn't fall and no cars or trucks went out of their way to chase me, so it was a great race in my opinion.

 

Geoff doing the awards ceremony - I actually won a door prize never done that before, so
it might be a harbinger of good things to come.
My first racing number in too long

My race number, it felt funny putting one on again after such a long time. I will be honest I was very nervous before the race started, visiting you know where far too often.

You know how you dream about pulling a race out of your butt with little training and no speedwork - that just is not reality - to run faster you gotta do the work.

The race brought me face-to-face with the fact that I have a lot to work on - to get to my goals this summer.

I do want to thank the Central Maine Striders and all the volunteers who helped make this such a great run today.

But I really want to thank Jen from Running With The Girls  for her encouragement for me to run the race on Twitter the other night.

Otherwise I probably wouldn't have made it to the starting line at all.

You know something, I am ready to do the work and I know that I will be faster by the end of the summer. I do wonder how my running will look a year from today?

More than likely though, I probably need to relax and just enjoy running more, not get so hung up on "I used to be fast" and accept that racing can be fun, instead of stressful.

I also plan to join the Central Maine Striders Running Club and see where that takes me.  I think this was the part of running that I have missed all these years - the social part that racing and belonging to a running club is a part of.

Here is a link to Maine Running Photos that has photos and videos of yesterday's race from David Colby Young.

I do know that this was not my last race this year :-).


Quality of Run: Very Good for the conditions
Time of Run: 10:00 A.M.
Temp: low 20's
Weather: Clear and 10-15 mph westerly wind
Clothes: Overdressed
This is day 14 of Janathon

Runners Have You Really Looked At Your Blog Lately

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 14, 2012


Most people seem to have one or the other -
there are others but these are the two most
popular blogging platforms.


I know that this is a weird post for a running/fitness blog, but runners or anyone really, if you have a blog - when was the last time you really looked at it?

  • - Does everything work - right?
  • - Can I easily subscribe to your blog?
  • - Do you have the same theme that you started with all those years ago?
  • - How do you think that a visitor sees your blog?

Okay Shaw what are you up to? Honestly I am probably going to put my foot in my mouth and piss a couple of people off, but other than that not too much.

I have gone through my feeds and I looked at a lot of blogs over the past couple of weeks. I have seen the full spectrum of blogs from the ones that are very visually appealing to the ones that - well to be honest looked like crap to me. When I say a blog looks like crap it means that they are poorly thought out, cluttered and distracting me from reading a blog post.

Who Do I Think I Am?

I am not a professional blogger and certainly don't have a lot of background in web or blog design, but have done this blogging thing for a little while and have developed a pretty good idea what a decent looking blog looks like and what doesn't work all that well.

Unfortunately

Since I started this updating my feeds, I have come across a few blogs that to be honest turned me off so badly that I didn't subscribe to their feed. Sometimes I didn't even bother to try to read their posts, because I was so distracted by all the crap that they had on their blog.

Not Pro Bloggers

I know that most runners are not professional bloggers, web designers or have boatloads of money to go hire someone to make their blog look good - hell I am not and can't either. 

However, just because many of us don't have the ability or money to do what we would really like to do with our blog's appearance, it doesn't mean that our blog's shouldn't look neat, clean and be somewhat visually appealing, have everything work correctly and be able to subscribe easily if they want to.

No One Right Way

Your blog is a reflection of who you are. What image do you project to your readers or potential readers? What image do you want to project? Are they the same?

Go to your blog and what is the first thing that you see when you land there? How does it affect you, is it appealing or is it busy and cluttered? If this wasn't your blog, would you like it?

There is no one right or wrong way to set up a blog, sometimes it is refreshing to see someone try something new or different, but there are surefire ways to drive people away from your blog and I saw too many that did that to me.

Advertising

One of the biggest problems I saw was how some bloggers were attempting to monetize their blog. They have so many advertisements, links, flashing ads, invitations to sign up for their page, or newsletter. Then they have a video that automatically starts, when I land on the site and other visual or audio distractions that make it so, I couldn't focus on the blog long enough to read the posts.

It also takes so long to load some of these sites, that sometimes I thought that there was a problem with my browser.

Hell I understand wanting to make some money through your blog(s), but when you overdo it, I know that it turns me off. If you want to make you blog look like the Sunday coupon section of the paper, go for it - it is your blog and your choice, but I probably won't subscribe to your feed or purposely go back to your site again.

Then again that is just me.

There are ways to advertise on your site that are bit more subtle and give your readers a better visual experience when we visit your blog. Do I expect everyone to stop advertising on blogs - hell no I don't plan to. I am just asking you to stop and look at your blog to make sure you are seeing the same thing that your potential customers/readers are seeing.

Widgets

Then there were the sites who have sidebars and feels the need to add every sidebar widget they can find, using .GIF files and then don't get rid of them when they have something else that does the same thing or heaven forbid they don't need it. There doesn't seem to be a rhyme or reason to where the widgets are placed or why they are even a part of this blog. All of these widgets again, slow down your load times and can frustrate your readers.

Look closely at your sidebar and you should have a specific purpose or reason for each widget that you have there. If there isn't one, why do you have that widget on your sidebar. After you do it once, go back and look at your widgets again and see if there are any questionable widgets left, why do you need them? 

If you really don't - get rid of them.

Badges

I know that we are proud of the races we have run, the distances we have completed, the "athons" we have participated in and all the awards that our blogs have won. However, at what point can the badges be retired or added to a page that readers and blog owners can look at if we want to, instead of having them in the sidebar. That doesn't mean get rid of all of your badges, but take a look at them, which ones really matter to you and what ones are just there because you don't have anyplace else to put them.

The reality is that

the blogs that are not visually appealing to me, are cluttered, way too freaking busy, don't have any sense of what goes where and make difficult to focus on the reading (which is why I go to most blogs - to read the posts, not look at advertisements or cool widgets - even though sometimes I do see something that looks interesting or is cool), because so much is going on around it.

That is one of the reasons why I started using Google Reader so much, I don't have to look at some of those blogs when I only want to read an article.

I am not an expert and I will be the first one to say it and I don't mean to be critical of anyone else's blog, because mine is nothing all that special either.

Just take a look

All I am asking is that you take a good long look at your blog and then look at it from the view of someone who just clicked a link and is arriving there for the first time. What kind of first impression is your blog going to make to that person.

Is your blog a reflection of you? Will it entice someone to stay and look around or will it confuse them and push them away.

Your Choice

How you setup and have your blog look is your choice. You have to decide if you are blogging for you or your readers, then you will have a better idea of how you will setup your blog.

I would never tell you how to set up your blog, but if it is not visually appealing or if it is too cluttered or distracting for me, I won't be back.

Friday, January 13, 2012

Saucony Peregrines - After 200 Miles Review

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 13, 2012


Over the course of the past three months, I have steadily increased my running, both the distance and the speed. Part of this story is the shoes that I have worn - Saucony Peregrines.

I did a lot of research last fall, both on the Internet and in my running logs to figure out what type of shoes that would best fit my personal running style, as well as what I ran in when I wasn't injured.

What it finally came down to for me at least, was that I didn't get injured as often in low heel height, light weight shoes that help promote forefoot striking.

I may be all wet, but I strongly believe that when a runner is mismatched to a shoe style that is at least part of the reason that running injuries happen.

There were several shoes that fit that description, but I also run in Maine during the winter, run a few trail runs, as well as running on the roads and dirt roads. I have used trail shoes in the past for winter running with very good success, so I was looking for a lightweight trail shoe with somewhere between a zero and 8mm drop.

After looking at and trying on different styles and other trail shoes, I settled on the Saucony Peregrines. They felt the best in the store (they didn't let me run outside in them) and I have had good luck with Saucony's in the past, so I bought them.



How have they done?

They are a great shoe! They have done everything that I have asked of them and below is a quick video review of my Saucony Peregrines:

Sometimes a video and pictures give a better idea of how these shoes look after the 200 miles than me writing and rambling on and on about them.

For a pair of running shoes with over 200 miles on them the Peregrines have held up extremely well. I am not easy on shoes, the soles tend to wear out rather quickly and the uppers tend to get ratty as well. In all of my other Saucony running shoes, my left foot wears the fabric/cushioning inside of the heel down to the cup and makes it so I can't wear them for running anymore (blisters). This has not happened with the Peregrines, which means I can keep running in them :-).



From what I can see now (unless they have an auto-destruct sequence built-in at a set amount of miles), my Peregrines should be able to go another 200-300 miles, before they are retired to less strenuous duty.

Now is the time to start researching, to figure out what my next pair of running shoes will be. Especially since they have to be put in the budget and planned for. After all I am starting to put more miles on my shoes and should have another pair to rotate in when these have 300 miles on them.

I do know that I will start with the Saucony Peregrines at the top of the new running shoe list. For me to choose something different, I will have to have my socks blown off. There are the newer zero drop or 4MM drop shoes that have piqued my interest from Altra, Skora, New Balance and Brooks. Even the Vibram Five Fingers are a possibility.

However, if I had to choose one pair of shoes today, a new pair Saucony Peregrines would be back for round 2. They have done everything I want from a running shoe on roads, trails, dirt roads, snow and slush. Plus they are a nice looking shoe.

FTC Disclaimer: I have not received any sort of compensation for doing this review. These running shoes were a pair that I purchased and have personally used. The views posted in this blog are my thoughts on a product that I have used and liked.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Born to Run - My Thoughts After Reading It

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah blog, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.


If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.


Originally posted on: January 3, 2012

Like so many others this book set me on a journey to try out minimalist running shoes, unfortunately or fortunately they didn't work the way that I or the the book thought they might for me. I am comfortably running in what would be considered maximalist shoes for a lot of my running. But I did learn a helluva of a lot more about running shoes and what works best for the way that I really run, not the way that I think that I run.

Yep, you gotta experiment to see what works for you.

I got through reading "Born to Run" by Christopher McDougall last night. It was the kind of book that I found interesting enough to interrupt my Internet addiction which is saying something.

For a book that was a mishmash of widely different subjects -- part travel log, origin of the species (homo sapiens), ultra running and exploitation of the Tarahamara by an unscrupulous "agent".  Even though the book jumps around A LOT  - the different story lines meshed and worked together to hold my interest.
There have been several reviews of this book that go into detail about what it is about, so I am not going to bother with just another book review.
I went into reading "Born to Run" with a lot of encouragement from my Twitter Running community and my wanting to learn more about running differently than I do now.
Did this book really do this? 
Yes, no and sorta.

Sunday, January 1, 2012

Time to Re-Set My Personal Records

After a lot of thought I have decided to move some of best of my old posts from Aging Runnah and A Runnah’s Story blogs, primarily the old reviews, maybe a few of the better posts and race reports that I have written over the years. I have a feeling that at some point, my WordPress.com blogs are simply going to go away and I want to still be able to go back and read some of the stuff I wrote.

If you are reading this blog post, that is why it is has been re-posted here.

Originally posted on: January 1, 2012



This year I turn double-nickel and over the past couple of weeks, knowing this has caused me to think a lot about the Glory Days - you know those days when we used to run fast, but bear no resemblance to our current running abilities.

The Personal Records (PRs) that I set during those glory days will never be broken - age and injury have taken their toll on my body. Running that fast again simply ain't happening. As much as I would like to believe that I could regain that competitive level again, the reality is I am older and slower and those PRs are very safe.

So what is a guy to do for a little extra motivation that going for a PR can be.

How about re-setting all PRs and starting 2012 with a clean slate - starting my running career from scratch.

Can I, can we do that? I don't know why not.

They are my records and it is my running career we are talking about, so by damn it is my choice.

But aren't there records of all those races we have run somewhere on the Internet? Someone has to have the times we have run somewhere and will come out at some inconvenient time and burst our bubbles by saying "Nananana, that wasn't your real PR, your real PR was...

Now if you are/were nationally or regionally ranked that might be true, but for most of us, especially us old farts, who ran a lot and mostly local races back in the dark ages, before race results were put in computers we are fairly safe. Besides I can always caveat it with "It's a new PR since I reset everything for 2012 and beyond.

Therefore, when I race a distance this year for the first time, it will be a new PR and hopefully I will have a few opportunities to challenge that new PR I set initially over the course of the year.

The distances I plan to race or run for time this year are:
  • 1.0 mile
  • 2.0 mile
  • 5K
  • 5.0 mile
  • 10K
  • 15K
  • 10 mile
  • 13.1

You notice that I didn't put any goal times up, I want this to be a clean slate as far as expectations (except that I stated that I want to try for a sub 20:00 minute 5K - whether that is very realistic we will find out). I do not plan to run any further than a half marathon this year - if I even go that far. I am saving longer distances for 2013, but only if I can stay uninjured for 2012.

So as of today all of my PRs that I set during the first 40 years of my running career are in the history books of my life and I don't have any Personal Records for now. I have a clean slate and a new set of goals to run for

How about you - when did you set your PRs? Were they many years ago or within the past 5 years? If they are more than 10 years old do you really think that you will ever lower them again? Is there any harm in re-setting your PR?